NewAbtractionNews, 2013

Parasol Projects, New York

Alex Tepliztky
Tout Petit La Planete
Dacops installing his newest “Line Jam”
It starts with one line: by using black photo tape, Dacops establishes a consistency which begets movement, rhythm. Two lines form a passage way of negative space, and the eye is suddenly entreated to find an escape route from the maze. To do so, however, would be folly: each corridor of white is eventually stymied, some more quickly than others. Where those blockages occur, one begins to see patterns emerging: planes consisting of three or more lines dissect one another; images appear and are negated as the viewer draws backward from the wall. And staring too long too closely at the wall undoubtedly forces the viewer back, for one grows dizzy from the geometric pell-mell.
Understanding Dacops’ creation process is integral to comprehending the piece as geometric expressionist. Despite the minimalist use of materials, his “line jams”—as he calls them—retain a sense of the emotive and spontaneous. As Pollock did in his drip paintings, Dacops immerses himself in the canvas, here being the wall space, and makes conscious decisions only in the moment. Design exists insofar as it is aesthetic, experiential and unconscious; thus controversy arises amid the harmony of the evenly spaced tape.
Dacops’ “line jams” are an inversion of the drip paintings of Pollock. Whereas Pollock’s web of skeins were seen as chaotic, and only gradually determined to contain fractals, order and harmony (which eventually made Pollock the first viable abstract artist in mainstream America), the “line jams’” geometry is instantly recognizable while only a close reading can bring to light disorder. At certain places in the work, lines overlap each other for longer than normal. One particular black line overlaps another, forming a glaring triangle that acts as a sort of visual black hole, pulling the eye toward it, despite its diminutive place in the work as a whole. This anomaly caused the artist much anguish, which demonstrates the spontaneity of the planning, but also forms the contours of the rules and boundaries inherent within the “line jam.”
But why leave it as so if it was so troubling to its creator? This remains open to speculation, but we might venture some theories. Similar to Dacops, Pollock’s indecisiveness between abstraction and figuration stopped him from producing art and eventually drove him to his self-induced death. The uncertainty in his career and terms in his work appears where figures emerge from the violent chaos of his drips. For Dacops—a doctor by trade and a well-known obsessive-compulsive—the places in which his geometric rules are broken could point to a masochistic drive within him. This could be a metaphor for the horror experienced within the sterile, geometric environment of the hospital, or the need of an obsessive compulsive to confront disorder in order to fixate his obsession. In any case, it is with these anomalies in the “line jam” series, that Dacops is able to blend the two domains that Pollock had divided by way of phenomenology: the purely optical and the kinesthetic, the corporeal. Through this convergence, Dacops brings the viewer into the making of his work.
In collaboration with Tiger Beer and PiPS Dacops newest “line jam” can be seen at 158 Roebling St, Brooklyn, NY starting Tuesday, April 24th.  Exhibition opening will be held from 6pm to 12am.

Alex Tepliztky

Tout Petit La Planete

Dacops installing his newest “Line Jam”

It starts with one line: by using black photo tape, Dacops establishes a consistency which begets movement, rhythm. Two lines form a passage way of negative space, and the eye is suddenly entreated to find an escape route from the maze. To do so, however, would be folly: each corridor of white is eventually stymied, some more quickly than others. Where those blockages occur, one begins to see patterns emerging: planes consisting of three or more lines dissect one another; images appear and are negated as the viewer draws backward from the wall. And staring too long too closely at the wall undoubtedly forces the viewer back, for one grows dizzy from the geometric pell-mell.

Understanding Dacops’ creation process is integral to comprehending the piece as geometric expressionist. Despite the minimalist use of materials, his “line jams”—as he calls them—retain a sense of the emotive and spontaneous. As Pollock did in his drip paintings, Dacops immerses himself in the canvas, here being the wall space, and makes conscious decisions only in the moment. Design exists insofar as it is aesthetic, experiential and unconscious; thus controversy arises amid the harmony of the evenly spaced tape.

Dacops’ “line jams” are an inversion of the drip paintings of Pollock. Whereas Pollock’s web of skeins were seen as chaotic, and only gradually determined to contain fractals, order and harmony (which eventually made Pollock the first viable abstract artist in mainstream America), the “line jams’” geometry is instantly recognizable while only a close reading can bring to light disorder. At certain places in the work, lines overlap each other for longer than normal. One particular black line overlaps another, forming a glaring triangle that acts as a sort of visual black hole, pulling the eye toward it, despite its diminutive place in the work as a whole. This anomaly caused the artist much anguish, which demonstrates the spontaneity of the planning, but also forms the contours of the rules and boundaries inherent within the “line jam.”

But why leave it as so if it was so troubling to its creator? This remains open to speculation, but we might venture some theories. Similar to Dacops, Pollock’s indecisiveness between abstraction and figuration stopped him from producing art and eventually drove him to his self-induced death. The uncertainty in his career and terms in his work appears where figures emerge from the violent chaos of his drips. For Dacops—a doctor by trade and a well-known obsessive-compulsive—the places in which his geometric rules are broken could point to a masochistic drive within him. This could be a metaphor for the horror experienced within the sterile, geometric environment of the hospital, or the need of an obsessive compulsive to confront disorder in order to fixate his obsession. In any case, it is with these anomalies in the “line jam” series, that Dacops is able to blend the two domains that Pollock had divided by way of phenomenology: the purely optical and the kinesthetic, the corporeal. Through this convergence, Dacops brings the viewer into the making of his work.

In collaboration with Tiger Beer and PiPS Dacops newest “line jam” can be seen at 158 Roebling St, Brooklyn, NY starting Tuesday, April 24th.  Exhibition opening will be held from 6pm to 12am.

lines & waves, 2012

PIPS Gallery, Williamsburg

Linejam 0001, 2008

Linejam 0004, 2010

Linejam 0002, 2009

Linejam 0003, 2009

Linejam 0007, 2010

Linejam Process Documentation, 2010

Wassaic Project

Crush Collective, 2012

Stage 2 : Perversion of Reality, 2013
Ski Mask from Walmart, 2 iPhone 5’s 16MB (black), photo tape
the jogging

82 Street Block Association Bulletin Board, 2011

Babycastles Barnwood Arcade Cabinet, 2010

Showpaper Chashama Gallery, New York

Your Art Here: Linejam, 2010

H & M

Artist In Residence | Wassaic Project, 2010

Wassaic, NY

Studio

8, 2010

BEHIND THE SCENES | Shooting the 8 dress, 2010